YWCA Madison

Racial Justice Summit Breakout Sessions 2016

Racial Justice Summit Breakout Sessions 2016

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Register for the Summit

September 29 AM Breakout Sessions (10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.):

September 29 PM Breakout Sessions (1:30 to 3:00 p.m.):

September 30 Breakout Sessions (10:00 to 11:30 a.m.):

September 29 AM Breakout Sessions

AM1: It's About Transformation, Not Just Transaction: A Participatory Workshop on Integrating Decolonization, Healing, and Racial Equity (Two-Part Session, must register for both AM & PM)

Description: In this engaging and intimate workshop, participants will deepen their knowledge and experience enacting racial equity via the sharing of leading international- and national-based efforts in decolonization and racial healing, and a hands-on learning process building off the wisdom and experience in the room. Workshop materials, format, and relationship-building will be grounded in transformative healing practices throughout the session, modeling well-being and creating the conditions necessary for change. Trainers will share personal experiences utilizing racial justice and healing practices within local government, higher education, and racial healing arenas that can be translated into any systems-change effort.

Presenter: Sonali Sangeeta Balajee is a thought leader, innovator, and activist with over 20 years of experience in racial equity, transformative change and decolonizing efforts , the arts, and healing.   Sonali's most recent efforts include leading racial equity efforts in local government for 10 years, and is currently embarking upon more independent writing, mobilizing, and educational efforts as a consultant.

Co-presenter: Josh Todd is the Director of Campus Compact Oregon, focusing specifically in the areas of racial equity, transformative leadership in higher education, youth development, and mindfulness.

AM2: Using an Integral Model to Cultivate and Sustain Self as Responsive Social Justice Activists

Description: We increase prospects for operating at our activist best when we intentionally embrace a contextually-responsive approach. Engaging contexts is foundational for appropriate and effective communications and social relations---the twin criteria for cross-racial and intercultural competence. In this workshop, we explore WHO we are as activists, what we bring to our work---our lenses/filters/frames and our sociopolitical locations---and how we engage relevant attributes to responsively activate and support racial and other social justice initiatives. You will enhance your understandings of yourself as activist and explore ways to mindfully engage a lifelong development journey that helps you sustain yourself in order to do your best learning, best engaging and best work in the interests of social justice.

Presenter: Dr. Hazel Symonette has 30+ years of experience in diversity, social justice and assessment arenas. Founder and former Director of the Excellence Through Diversity Institute (2002-2009)—a year-long intensive train-the-trainers/facilitators campus workforce learning community and organizational change support network organized around contextually-responsive, multi-level assessment and evaluation. Founder and current Director of a similar intensive learning community for Student/Workforce Teams: the Student Success Institute. Served as national faculty: Health Research and Education Trust's Cultural Competency Fellowship Program; Institute on Higher Education Policy Summer Academies; Association of American Colleges & Universities Leadership for Making Excellence Inclusive Institutes and the Integrative Learning & the Departments Institutes.

AM3: Infamous Mothers: Changing the Narratives Around Black Mothering

Description: It is no secret that for centuries, black mothers have been under attack. News headings, movies, medical research, sociological studies have all promoted narratives that vilified and criminalized black mothers. These narratives have fueled the creation of laws and policies that reinforce the oppression and disempowerment of an already disenfranchised group. This workshop raises awareness about this problem, and it provides strategies for addressing it. It will do this in two ways; call attention to stories and visual representations about these mothers that have shaped the nations understanding of them. Next, we will look at a repeatable and scalable model that works to address this problem.

Presenter: Sagashus T. Levingston is the Founder/CEO of Infamous Mothers, LLC. By the time of this conference, she will have completed her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her focus is literature throughout the African Diaspora the showcases revolutionary mothers. She is the single mother of six amazing children. And she is an infamous mother.

Co-Presenter: Amy Gannon is the Interim Dean at the Edgewood College School of Business in Madison, WI. She provides oversight of all administrative aspects of the school, including curricular development for undergraduate and graduate programs. Prior to being appointed Interim Dean, Amy was the Associate Dean for the undergraduate programs and an Assistant Professor of management in the School of Business. She taught courses in entrepreneurship and organizational behavior, helped design the school’s Career Development Program for business majors, and started the Edgewood College Business Plan Showcase event. Amy has BA in International Studies and Economics from The American University, a MBA from Boston College, and a Doctorate of Business Administration in Organizational Behavior from Boston University. Prior to becoming educator, she worked in government, non-profit and private sector organizations. She lives in Madison with her husband and two young children.

AM4: White Privilege 101: I Am George Zimmerman. Changing The Narrative Through The Lens of White Supremacy, White Privilege, and Oppression

Description: This session examines and explores white privilege/oppression and the imperative that those promoting diversity must “get in on the conversations.” Participants explore how these headline stories relate to the intersectionality and impacts of power, white privilege and white supremacy experienced in everyday life. Examine how to be a leader in using the recent surge in racial incidents as teachable moments and how to digest and respond to media through a critical lens. Learn to engage in critical conversational tactics to deepen understanding and community engagement, especially when viewpoints differ and tensions run high. Participants will gain skills and insights necessary for effective personal and institutional transformation.

Presenter: Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. has pursued and achieved success in academia, business, diversity, leadership and community service. In 1996, he started America & MOORE, LLC to provide comprehensive diversity, privilege and leadership trainings/workshops. As Founder and Director of the White Privilege Conference, Dr. Moore has helped the conference become one of the top national and international conferences for participants who want to move beyond dialogue and into action around issues of diversity, power, privilege, and leadership. In 2014, Dr. Moore founded The Privilege Institute, which engages people in research, education, action and leadership through workshops, conferences, publications and strategic partnerships and relationships. Dr. Moore is co-founder of the on-line journal Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, co-editor of Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories and the forthcoming, The White Women’s Guide to Teaching Black Boys.

AM5: Immigration and Dane County: Understanding the State of Latinos in WI

Description: The Latino community represents the fastest growing community in the state. As neighborhoods quickly diversity we need to understands the status, needs, and assets of this emerging population. This session will present demographics and discuss opportunities for engaging the Latino community in transforming inequities in Madison.

Presenter: Karen Menéndez Coller

AM6: Roadmap to Equity I: Reducing Disparities in Economic Wellbeing

Description: In this session, you will hear from a panel of local private and non-profit organizations who have developed creative strategies to increase the employment, income and wealth of Dane County’s Low Income Families of Color by 2020. Panelists include representatives from: Positive Women for Change, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin, Operation Fresh Start, Downtown Rotary Inc., and UW Health. Participants in this session are encouraged to attend the Roadmap to Equity strategy session in the afternoon.

Panelists: Joanna Cervantes, Beverly Hutcherson, Rachel Krinsky, Gregory Markle and Kia Stearn

Moderator: Angela Russell

AM7: Roadmap to Equity II: Supporting Working Families

Description: In this session, representatives of multiple systems that work to support working families of color as they balance the demands of both parenting and employment will discuss different strategies and barriers related to successfully providing all the necessary intersecting supports. Panelists include representatives from Madison Metro, the YWCA, Centro Hispano, and Dane County Juvenile Justice and Human Services. Participants in this session are encouraged to attend the Roadmap to Equity strategy session in the afternoon

Panelists: Andre Johnson, Julie Ahnen, Mariela Quesada Centeno and Chuck Kamp

Moderator: Vanessa McDowell

AM8: Roadmap to Equity III: Reducing Disparities in Educational Achievement

Description: In this session, a panel of local organizations who are working towards assuring that more children of color are born healthy, meet developmental milestones, are ready for kindergarten and succeed throughout their school careers by 2020 will present on their different models and strategies. Panelists include representatives from: One City Early Learning, Clark St. Community School, Dane County Timebank, Madison Police Department, and JustifiedAnger. Participants in this session are encouraged to attend the Roadmap to Equity strategy session in the afternoon.

Panelists: Jill Gurtner, Greg Rossetti, Kaleem Caire and a Justified Anger Representative

Moderator: Ananda Mirilli

AM9: Mindfulness for the People: Re-imagining the Mindfulness Movement

Description: Mindfulness for the People radically re-imagines a mindfulness movement where the wisdom and insight of people of color are central to mindfulness research, teaching and practice. Join us on a somatic journey of revealing and disrupting whiteness in the mindfulness movement in Madison. Then radically re-imagine with us the sensory and somatic power of people of color central to mindfulness research, teaching and practice in the spaces/systems we live and breathe daily in Madison.

Presenter: Dr. Angela Rose Black is an Activist, Scholar, Practitioner, and Thought Leader in the mindfulness movement. For the last 15 years she has committed her journey to making room for Black women’s voices in mind-body research and practice. Her program of research explores the cultural relevance of existing mindfulness and compassion training for Black women across the lifespan. As Founder of Mindfulness for the People, Dr. Black is committed to re-imagining a mindfulness movement where people of color are central to mindfulness research, teaching and practice.

AM10: From TeJop to Madison: The Whole Story of our City

Description: This will be an educational session in which participants will learn more about the whole story of Madison. Beginning with the creation story of the Ho-Chunk people, participants will hear traditional stories connected to Madison and understand more about the history of the Mounds and land many of us now call home.

Presenter: Missy Tracy is the Municipal Relations Coordinator at Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison and a tribal member of the Ho-Chunk Nation. Her career spans three decades in business with 22 years of management experience. For the past eight years, Missy has worked for Indian country in Public Relations, Training, Regulation and Community Relations. Missy has served as the Seminar Director at the National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA Seminar Institute) and the Senior Public Relations Manager for Ho-Chunk Gaming Wisconsin Dells. Missy has been on the board of the Wisconsin Council on Problem Gaming since 2009, and has delivered an award winning strategic public relations marketing program with recognition from the Central Wisconsin Community Action Council, Red Cross and the Baraboo Chamber of Commerce.

AM11: Organizing for Racial Justice

Description: This highly interactive session will focus on movement building with an emphasis on racial justice. What can we learn from past historical movements and what can we learn from our long history of everyday people, including white people, creating positive changes in their communities? Participants will deepen their understanding of structural oppression through an interactive story, learning how it can hurt and divide our communities. Participants will explore possible solutions for building stronger and more vibrant communities where all people can thrive. Through shared analysis, participation and dialogue, we will explore what is necessary to fight for real systemic change, also learning about the different ways everyday people and organizations in Madison are making their steps towards racial justice more meaningful and effective. This workshop is intended for participants who acknowledge that racism is a real and pervasive force that can be subtle or unintentional, but is no less impactful on our community.

Presenter: Organizer with Racial Justice Tipping Point campaign, Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice, also work with various racial justice and queer and trans organizations locally and nationally, Z! Haukeness’ work is rooted in the intersections of identities, bringing more white people into the work for racial justice, and working closely with various people of color led organizations and initiatives to make broad change towards collective liberation.

Co-Presenter: Shawna Lutzow has been a member of Groundwork, Madison's white anti-racism collective, since 2014. She has worked at Madison-area Urban Ministry since 2011, starting as an AmeriCorps member with the Circles of Support program and now coordinates Reentry Simulations, Mentoring Connections, Family Connections, and Reading Connections, all programs focused on supporting youth and families impacted by incarceration and emphasizing the community's responsibility in reentry.  

AM12: The Internet and the Impact of Online Racism on Youth of Color

Description: We will identify how to approach youth of color about their online use, trends, and dangers. Youth of color, unlike other youth, have specific vulnerabilities when interacting online. With so many new Memes, binders, tags, and forms of messaging the internet breeds new possibilities of harassment. How do we talk to a 3rd grader about politics seen on the internet to how to talk to a teen about race discussions or how to approach racist content online. We will approach a couple of scenarios and form best practices for families of color.

Presenter: After years of successful community activism, Araceli Esparza has become a teaching artist. She empowers people to get comfortable working and living with people who are from different cultures, class, and gender backgrounds. Araceli holds an MFA from Hamline University and was named 2015 Women to Watch For by Brava Magazine.

Co-Presenter: Britney Sinclair in a  Madison native, who grew up within the community. From childhood to adulthood, Britney has worked beside many community leaders. This made her eager to see change, and drove her to connect many through source of social media. Her passion for empowering women of color and community connecting through social media, created BreSocial. Bresocial now creates movement building social media campaigns, and social media marketing to connect the community to engage interpersonally.

 

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September 29 PM Breakout Sessions

PM1: It's About Transformation, Not Just Transaction: A Participatory Workshop on Integrating Decolonization, Healing, and Racial Equity

Description: In this engaging and intimate workshop, participants will deepen their knowledge and experience enacting racial equity via the sharing of leading international- and national-based efforts in decolonization and racial healing, and a hands-on learning process building off the wisdom and experience in the room. Workshop materials, format, and relationship-building will be grounded in transformative healing practices throughout the session, modeling well-being and creating the conditions necessary for change. Trainers will share personal experiences utilizing racial justice and healing practices within local government, higher education, and racial healing arenas that can be translated into any systems-change effort.

Presenter: Sonali Sangeeta Balajee is a thought leader, innovator, and activist with over 20 years of experience in racial equity, transformative change and decolonizing efforts , the arts, and healing.   Sonali's most recent efforts include leading racial equity efforts in local government for 10 years, and is currently embarking upon more independent writing, mobilizing, and educational efforts as a consultant.

Co-presenter: Josh Todd is the Director of Campus Compact Oregon, focusing specifically in the areas of racial equity, transformative leadership in higher education, youth development, and mindfulness.

PM2: Using an Integral Model to Cultivate and Sustain Self as Responsive Social Justice Activists

Description: We increase prospects for operating at our activist best when we intentionally embrace a contextually-responsive approach. Engaging contexts is foundational for appropriate and effective communications and social relations---the twin criteria for cross-racial and intercultural competence. In this workshop, we explore WHO we are as activists, what we bring to our work---our lenses/filters/frames and our sociopolitical locations---and how we engage relevant attributes to responsively activate and support racial and other social justice initiatives. You will enhance your understandings of yourself as activist and explore ways to mindfully engage a lifelong development journey that helps you sustain yourself in order to do your best learning, best engaging and best work in the interests of social justice.

Presenter: Dr. Hazel Symonette has 30+ years of experience in diversity, social justice and assessment arenas. Founder and former Director of the Excellence Through Diversity Institute (2002-2009)—a year-long intensive train-the-trainers/facilitators campus workforce learning community and organizational change support network organized around contextually-responsive, multi-level assessment and evaluation. Founder and current Director of a similar intensive learning community for Student/Workforce Teams: the Student Success Institute. Served as national faculty: Health Research and Education Trust's Cultural Competency Fellowship Program; Institute on Higher Education Policy Summer Academies; Association of American Colleges & Universities Leadership for Making Excellence Inclusive Institutes and the Integrative Learning & the Departments Institutes.

PM3: A Restorative Justice Alternative to the Criminal Justice System

Description: Dane County Human Services, in coordination with the Dane County Restorative Justice Coalition, was awarded the Brighter Futures Grant in 2015 to expand restorative justice programs to youth ages 12 to 17 years old in Madison. With a mission to reduce racial disparities in the juvenile justice system, the grant allows an expansion of successful school-based restorative justice and peer court programs into the criminal justice system, Every youth ages 12 to 17 who is issued a municipal ticket by the Madison Police Department may now opt-out of court and instead opt-in to a restorative justice alternative. Youth who opt into restorative justice will have no criminal record of the ticket or arrest and will not have an entry into the criminal justice system. YWCA Madison, Dane Count TimeBank, and Briarpatch Youth Services will provide direct services to all youth who opt in, either through a restorative justice circle or youth court. They will attempt heal the harm created and resolve the root cause of the youth's behavior, and provide wrap around services to support the youth to make better choices in the future. This presentation will discuss the goals and missions of the coalition, explain how their programs work and how it overcame obstacles to success, and discuss the tremendous successes they see so far in pulling youth out of the criminal justice system and healing the youth and community.

Presenter: Carousel Bayrd is the Policy and Partnership Coordinator for the Restorative Justice Department at the YWCA Madison. She also leads up Advocacy Team and works to support policy changes in the political and criminal justice realms. Carousel is serving her 11th year as an elected official on the Dane County Board, and she hosts A Public Affair, a talk news radio show, on WORT every Tuesday. She has two smart daughters.

Co-presenters: Gwen Jordan, Municipal and Youth Peer Court Coordinator - Briarpatch Youth Services and Lorrie Hurckes, Executive Director - Dane County Timebank

PM4: Equity Learning Moments in the Workplace

Description: Since participating in the YWCA's Creating Equitable Organizations training, the Morgridge Center for Public Service has integrated Equity Learning Moments into all of our staff meetings. This workshop will explain the purpose behind these and describe the structure, but mostly, it will be experiential and will walk the participants through a variety of the Equity Learning Moments we've used in the past. The hope is that participants will bring these back to their own workplaces, and also come up with their own to share with the group.

Presenters: Kari Temkin and Kathy Cramer

PM5: Changing the Narrative - Framing Issues with a Racial Equity Lens

Description: Belief systems, which inform policy and law, can contribute to and perpetuate injustice. This injustice rests on subconscious and conscious beliefs about who matters in society and who does not. Learn and understand why frames are important vehicles to counteract negative messages and to engage in re-framing an issue through a racial equity lens. This session will provide examples of how injustice is perpetuated through the media, and participants will learn the importance of framing an issue with a racial equity lens in order to change the narrative around race.

Presenter: Rinku Sen is the President and Executive Director of Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation and the Publisher of the award-winning news site Colorlines.  

PM6: Changing the Narrative: The movement to eliminate Native Mascots

Description: This interactive workshop will focus on imagery, particularly in sports, that use Native American-like clothing, chants, names, mascots and logos. Participants will learn about what is being done at the local, state, national and international level currently regarding Native Mascots & Logos. Through this action-oriented workshop, participants will gain an understanding of the current issue and develop an action plan they can take with them.

Presenter: Barbara Munson is a woman of the Oneida Nation. She has chaired the 'Indian' Mascot and Logo Taskforce for Wisconsin Indian Education Association since its inception in 1997.

Co-Presenter: Z! Haukeness is a community organizer in Madison, Wisconsin, working on various racial and social justice issues locally and nationally. Z! is trans and gender nonconforming and carries the privilege and oppression of this identity in their work for liberation.

Co-Presenter: Dr. Paula Mohan teaches in the American Indian Studies program at UW-Madison and is a member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association Taskforce on Race-Based Mascots and Logos. She served on the MMSD committee to change the dresscode in Madison schools to include a ban on Race-based logos and is a long time advocate to incorporate a decolonized view of first nations and peoples into educational practices.

PM7: FACES OF INCARCERATION: Changing the Narrative.

Description: “FACES OF INCARCERATION: Changing the Narrative” is an art exhibit created in late 2015 to raise awareness around disparities that lead to lack of opportunity, crimes of poverty and chronic incarceration. The workshop will augment an exhibit of portraits by local painters, images of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated and people stories that humanize them written by author Pat Dillon. After participants view the exhibit led by Rudy Bankston, a formerly incarcerated man of color who is the community liaison at James Madison Memorial High School, and Ali Muldrow who works with juveniles in Dane County Juvenile Detention Center. Each will briefly tell their stories and talk about polices and practices that disproportionately target people of color in the criminal justice system. Afterward, participants will break into groups to discuss issues prompted by the facilitators and answer questions that would open up discussion for the entire room. This show will be at the Overture Center in July 2017.

Presenter: Roderick “Rudy” Bankston is currently the Community Liaison for James Madison Memorial High School’s Peace Center, a restorative justice program developed as an alternative to detention, suspension and expulsion. At 19 years young, Rudy was sentenced to life in prison for a murder he did not commit. It took Rudy two decades, and his post-conviction lawyer, Robert Henak, roughly two years, to get the case back into court and resolved. That was just over a year ago. While incarcerated, Rudy grew into a prolific reader, writer and poet. In 2012, he published the novel, “Shed So Many Tears,” a cautionary tale about the pitfalls of the Milwaukee streets. He also authored numerous poems about focused on the beauty and the challenges of being Black in America. Since his release he has become active in community movements around prison reform, reentry and mentoring. After a short stint as a volunteer for a local high school, Rudy was hired by the Madison School District. 

Co-presenter: Ali Muldrow, Racial Justice Youth organizer for GSAFE and coordinator of the New Narrative Project at the Juvenile Detention Center.

PM8: Roadmap to Equity: Collective Action Strategy Session

Description: After learning about the goals and indicators in the Roadmap to Equity, join Julie Nelson and Glenn Harris for an action-oriented session in which we determine next steps for our community, and how each of us can be involved in Changing the Narrative around Race in Dane County from worst to first.

Presenter: Julie Nelson serves as Senior Vice President of Center for Social Inclusion and the Director of the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE), a program of CSI. She is also a Senior Fellow with the Haas Institute for and Fair and Inclusive Society (HIFIS) at the University of California, Berkeley. Julie is the former Director of the Seattle Office for Civil Rights where she served eight years, providing both vision and hands-on work to Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Initiative.

PM10: The Transformative Impact of Mindfulness in Racial Justice Work

Description: Transformative impact in racial justice work involves deep listening and authentically connecting with, caring for, and tuning into ourselves and others. The work necessitates this mindful attentiveness while in the mist of myriad complex and, at times, intense emotions and cognitions. For those leading these efforts and seeking to influence and affect positive and sustained change, these qualities and skills are particularly essential. Mindfulness practices are one tool to support this transformational work in various ways and on multiple levels. In this workshop, participants are invited to engage in experiential learning that examines ways that mindfulness can support: 1) the work of uncovering and unpacking existing narratives and biases, including ways we relate to ourselves and others around self-care and leadership in the context of racial justice work, 2) the practices of self-nurturance and self-care as a critical aspect in racial justice work, and 3) expand our awareness of personal and environmental barriers to the act of self-care and ways to begin to overcome such barriers.

Presenter: As a psychologist, consultant, and mindfulness teacher, Dr. Lisa Baker works with individuals and organizations addressing leadership development, interpersonal relationships and processes to support wellness, excellence and sustainability, all of which aim to integrate goals of diversity, inclusion, and equity. Dr. Baker owns a consultation and private practice in Madison. She has given workshops for organizations including YWCA, CUNA Mutual Group, and WI State Public Defenders. Dr. Baker currently teaches mindful leadership classes, with the Sustainability Leadership Program, community-based offerings at Edgewood College. She also offers tailored mindful leadership programming to organizations and individuals. On a national level, Dr. Baker serves as Co-Chair for the Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Advisory Committee for the Center for Mindfulness, UMass, Worchester, MA.

Co-presenter: Nola Walker is currently the Assistant Director for Assessment with UW-Madison Libraries. Ms. Walker began racial/equity justice work over 30 years ago contextualized in employment and federally funded programs for local, state, federal and higher education initiatives. Beyond 'the work' she lives in pursuit of equitable inclusion through engaging in such efforts as the YWCA Summit, volunteering, and her current passion as Founder/CEO of 'EcoCultural Connections, LLC', specializing in facilitating inclusive environmental initiatives.

PM11: Transracial: Reclaiming the Adoptees Narrative

Description: Discover the lives of transracial adoptees. The term, “transracial” has been around for a while, but former NAACP Spokane President Rachel Dolezal forever changed its meaning and further disenfranchised adoptees of color. This workshop will include the writings of transracial adoptees and the work adult adoptees are doing to elevate their voices.

Presenter: Rosita González is an activist, an artist and a Korean-American adoptee. She serves as Feminism Columnist and is a former editor at the Lost Daughters, an adoptee-centric website. Her activism is rooted in her experiences as an adoptee, a woman of color and a mother. In November of 2014, she sparked the #flipthescript, adoptee-centric movement on Twitter, and in 2015, she and her family moved to Seoul for five months. Her writings have appeared in three books and online at the Good Men Project and xojane. She blogs online as mothermade.

Co-Presenter: Grace Newton is a recent graduate from Macalester College and a Chinese adoptee. She has interned for the Minnesota based company Land of Gazillion Adoptees LLC and served as editor for the college section of Gazillion Voices, the first adoptee led adoption magazine. Grace is a recent member of The Lost Daughters and is one of the founding members of her alma matter's Transracial/Transnational Adoptee Identity Collective; both are places she has found a great sense of camaraderie. Grace has spoken at two Korean Adoptee and Adoptive Family Network (KAAN) Conferences and a Midwest Asian American Students' Union Conference, as well as on panels at University of St. Thomas, Macalester College, and for the Families with Children from Asia – Midwest. When Grace isn't discussing issues of race and adoption in person, she is writing about it online at her blog.

PM12: The N!gga(er) Word: Is There a Message in The Madness?

Description: Who is allowed to say the N!igga (er) word? What do we do/say when N!gga (er) is said in our classrooms, hallways, practice fields, dinner table, cafeterias and resident halls? Ignoring the N!gga (er) word is not an option anymore – You can hear N!gga everywhere in the 21st century. Participants are challenged to examine their personal/professional histories with N!gga (er), when and/or how they first heard N!gga (er) and pictures/feelings associated with the word.

Presenter: Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. has pursued and achieved success in academia, business, diversity, leadership and community service. In 1996, he started America & MOORE, LLC to provide comprehensive diversity, privilege and leadership trainings/workshops. As Founder and Director of the White Privilege Conference, Dr. Moore has helped the conference become one of the top national and international conferences for participants who want to move beyond dialogue and into action around issues of diversity, power, privilege, and leadership. In 2014, Dr. Moore founded The Privilege Institute, which engages people in research, education, action and leadership through workshops, conferences, publications and strategic partnerships and relationships. Dr. Moore is co-founder of the on-line journal Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, co-editor of Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories and the forthcoming, The White Women’s Guide to Teaching Black Boys.

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September 30 Breakout Sessions

Session 1: Infamous Mothers: Changing the Narratives Around Black Mothering

Description: It is no secret that for centuries, black mothers have been under attack. News headings, movies, medical research, sociological studies have all promoted narratives that vilified and criminalized black mothers. These narratives have fueled the creation of laws and policies that reinforce the oppression and disempowerment of an already disenfranchised group. This workshop raises awareness about this problem, and it provides strategies for addressing it. It will do this in two ways; call attention to stories and visual representations about these mothers that have shaped the nations understanding of them. Next, we will look at a repeatable and scalable model that works to address this problem.

Presenter: Sagashus T. Levingston is the Founder/CEO of Infamous Mothers, LLC. By the time of this conference, she will have completed her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her focus is literature throughout the African Diaspora the showcases revolutionary mothers. She is the single mother of six amazing children. And she is an infamous mother.

Co-Presenter: Amy Gannon is the Interim Dean at the Edgewood College School of Business in Madison, WI. She provides oversight of all administrative aspects of the school, including curricular development for undergraduate and graduate programs. Prior to being appointed Interim Dean, Amy was the Associate Dean for the undergraduate programs and an Assistant Professor of management in the School of Business. She taught courses in entrepreneurship and organizational behavior, helped design the school’s Career Development Program for business majors, and started the Edgewood College Business Plan Showcase event. Amy has BA in International Studies and Economics from The American University, a MBA from Boston College, and a Doctorate of Business Administration in Organizational Behavior from Boston University. Prior to becoming educator, she worked in government, non-profit and private sector organizations. She lives in Madison with her husband and two young children.

Session 2: Beyond the Numbers: Inequity and Storytelling

Description: Storytelling is one way to break down the walls that separate smaller groups within our larger community by showing, on a human level, the struggles, challenges, victories, defeats, and dreams that shape our lives. This workshop will explore storytelling as a tool for social change that can lead to discoveries for both the writer and the audience. To demonstrate this power, students from the UW Odyssey Project will share stories that they have written and performed in order to make inequity, which is often seen through the lens of abstract numbers or statistics, more visible. Now entering its 14th year, The UW Odyssey Project is a free, six-credit humanities course for adult students facing economic barriers to their education. Our students often use the process of storytelling to more fully come to terms with the crises that have impacted their lives, such homelessness, domestic abuse, racism, fleeing their country of origin, substance abuse, or any number of other obstacles; at the same time, these stories can offer the audience a glimpse at what inequity looks and feels like to an individual. After hearing from Odyssey students who have used their voices to influence larger conversations on equality, this workshop will then spend some time exploring how our own stories can be used to advance social justice.

Presenter: Kevin Mullen earned his PhD in Literary Studies at UW-Madison, and is the Assistant Director of the UW Odyssey Project and the Writing Instructor (for both the main class and an writing class for alumni).

Co-presenters: Odyssey Students

Session 3: Bindis, Burqas, and Blackface: When Does Cultural "Borrowing" Become Ignorant Appropriation?

Description: In recent years the term "cultural appropriation" has emerged as a hot-button topic in society especially in the fashion and entertainment industries. Come and learn about what cultural appropriation is and how we celebrate a culture versus appropriating it. We will explore this pertinent issue through looking at specific examples in the media, the impact of cultural appropriation as well as strategies at the individual, institutional, and societal levels to reduce it.

Presenter: Fiyyaz Karim, is currently an Instructor at the University of Minnesota and teaches courses in Multicultural Counseling, Group Psychotherapy, and Grief and Loss. Mr. Karim’s interest in social justice issues came out of both doing AmeriCorps after college as well as teaching ESL abroad in Thailand. He has done professional trainings and presentations at conferences on issues including micro-aggressions and discrimination. Clinical interests include identity development, health psychology, and trauma. Prior to working in higher education, Fiyyaz has been employed in a variety of community mental health outpatient settings, many geared towards addressing the needs of underserved and minority populations.

Session 4: Color-Brave: White Engagement in the Racial Justice Movement

Description: In recent years, the number of white people engaged in anti-racism, social justice work has increased significantly. Likewise, schools, faith communities, nonprofits, public agencies and private corporations have begun to look at racial inequities and the impact of white privilege within their institutions. Oftentimes, white allies with the best intentions, make choices and use methods that reinforce the privilege and inequities that they are fighting to change. As work expands and to create a true multi-racial democracy, it has become necessary for strong white allies to analyze what they do and how they do it to ensure that they work in solidarity with people of color. During this interactive, 1½ hour workshop, participants will explore how to move from white awareness and urgency to appropriate action as a white ally. We will further explore concepts around white leadership and white followership.

Presenter: Tracey Robertson is Cofounder and Executive Director of Fit Oshkosh, Inc., a grassroots, nonprofit organization whose mission is to increase the Racial Literacy of the adult residents in Winnebago County. She has decades of professional experience that includes entrepreneurship, business development, consulting and administration. She is a much sought-after and engaging public speaker on the subject of race, and has spoken at venues throughout Wisconsin and the nation. Tracey served on the Wisconsin Council of Children and Family Services Explorer Team, and currently serves on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Chancellor’s Council, and on the Friends of Oshkosh Community Media Board. In January 2016, she was awarded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award by the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. In 2012, Tracey authored and self-published a book entitled, My Unapologetic, Undiluted Love for the Music Artist Prince. A second book, entitled Nonprofit Do It! is in the works. She is the mother of 3 adult children and has 1 grandson.

Co-Presenter: Marijke van Roojen, LM, CPM, MPH has dedicated her professional life to two broad disciplines: maternal child health with an emphasis on the social determinants of health, and community-based mediation, restorative justice and the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution. In addition to 29 years in private practice, Ms. van Roojen has served on numerous professional oversight committees and boards, at the local, state and national levels. She has a long-term passion for ensuring equitable access to education and resources, workforce development, and the promotion of culturally concordant and relevant social and health services. 

Ms. van Roojen is also a conflict resolution specialist and has served as a senior mediator, consultant, trainer and facilitator for dispute resolution centers, superior and juvenile courts, non-profits and professional associations, state agencies, school districts, the armed forces, and faith communities. She designs and delivers innovative meetings management and large group facilitation courses, Color-Brave racial literacy workshops, as well as various adult, youth and victim/offender mediation programs. Ms. van Roojen serves as the President of the Wisconsin Guild of Midwives and as the President of the non-profit Fit Oshkosh, Inc., a racial literacy organization in Winnebago County, WI. She is also an AAP/AHA Neonatal Resuscitation Instructor, focusing on midwife-attended, out-of-hospital and low resource birth environments. 

Session 5: Madison Hip-Hop: Loved, Hated, Embraced, and Feared

Description: A strong arts and entertainment community that represents Madison's diversity, is vital to our community. Sustainability and inclusion in the arts and entertainment are goals for which many local organizations and initiatives currently strive. In 2013, the City of Madison developed a Cultural Plan with a vision that imagines a future in which Madison... is a community where everyone is welcome in the creative conversation and the free-flowing exchange of diverse voices creates a palpable validity and excitement. Unfortunately, like many other areas of the City, Madison?s Arts Culture exhibits deep racial disparities. In particular, music and entertainment preferred by African American residents (including but not limited to Hip-Hop) has been routinely suppressed in Madison’s nightlife. While Hip-Hop music and imagery has infiltrated pop culture, it remains misunderstood and even feared. We believe that providing educational and economic development opportunities for Hip-Hop artists is empowering and instills a new sense of pride in their work and culture. We also believe that increasing performance opportunities presented to the general community is the only way to increase understanding of the culture, which supports the vision cast in the City of Madison Cultural Plan.

Presenter: ShaH Evans eats, sleeps and breathes Hip-Hop, and has been booking local and national acts for years. He is the owner of music blog, Get Your Buzz Up.com and ME Management and Consulting. ShaH also speaks about positive life choices with youth and young adults in Madison and surrounding areas.

Co-Presenter: Karen Reece was born and raised in Madison. She does research and evaluation by day and follows the music by night. As a classically-trained cellist and occasional singer, Karen has a great ear for music and a particular love for local rock and Hip-Hop. She loves to support local musicians who are grinding for the art. Karen spends much of her time working for social and racial justice.

Session 6: Racial Justice Starts With Us: Begin a Community Group For Witnessing Whiteness

Description: Shelly Tochluck developed a book workshop series, Witnessing Whiteness: The Need To Talk About Race and How to Do It. Come learn how to use this curriculum in your communities, to transform thinking and lives, by witnessing whiteness and interrupting racism. It’s likely that white folks want to do something about racism, disparities, and inequity. But what are you actually doing? This session offers a way to build your own and others' capacity to forward anti-racism work. Witnessing Whiteness is an 11-week curriculum, available to anyone online, that follows the book. It’s designed to explore the white experience as it relates to racism. Laurel and Laurie started this series in Madison with a group of friends interested in racial justice. It had a profound impact, so they’ve continued to offer it, widening their reach. They believe that this curriculum, used in community, can be transformative for racial justice.

Presenter: Laurel Finn is a school counselor at Wright Middle School in Madison. She participated in the YWCA Racial Justice series 5 years ago. Since then, she has participated in the Racial Healing Institute, Groundworks’ trainings, Equity conversations in the MMSD, training as a Race to Equity Report facilitator and Awaken Chicago Racial Justice Conference in Chicago. In order to reach out to her white community about racism, she began co-facilitating these workshops one year ago.

Co-Presenter: Laurie O’Donnell works in healthcare and facilitates learning and skill development in communication, leadership, change, and social justice. She’s been involved with Landmark Worldwide, YWCA Madison, National Conference for Community and Justice STL, among other organizations. Laurie has a meandering education in Exercise Science, Athletic Training, and Intercultural Relations. Around town, you can find her playing ultimate frisbee, practicing yoga, and cheering on her nieces and nephews in their many activities.

Session 7: Microagressions: Intent vs. Impact

Description: Microaggressions workshop description: Have you ever been concerned about saying something that might be hurtful to someone and not even realizing it? Or have you personally experienced the cumulative toll of microaggressive comments? If either of these things resonate with you, in this workshop participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the intent vs. impact, and new ways to cope when microaggressions occur in the workplace, at home, and in the community. The workshop will begin with a brief overview of microaggressions, as well as work through some examples of microaggressions that occur across settings. Some time will be spent in small groups discussing strategies for interrupting microaggressions.

Presenter: Naomi Takahashi is a YWCA Madison Racial Justice facilitator. She has a Bachelors in Psychology from Wesleyan University, and a Masters in Social Work from UW-Madison. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has experience providing intensive in-home family therapy, as well working at the macro level in program implementation, project management, training, and organizational change related to Race and Gender equity. As a biracial person and a Wisconsin native, Naomi believes that learning how to identify microaggressions particularly prevalent in our state as well as understanding how to interrupt them are key strategies necessary to diminish inequities that are prevalent in our societal structures and systems

Session 8: Race To Destiny: Neighborhood Challenges Of Young Black Men

Description: Race to Destiny is an engaging and interactive simulation board game where participants will “face” many of the same, gut wrenching choices that young, black men have to make, which – in the real world - have potentially life-long consequences. Many of these choices are often times made while in survival mode. R2D will challenge thoughts, encourage dynamic thinking, and, hopefully, allow honest conversations among group members. R2D will shed light on the hopes, dreams, struggles, and disappointments that shape and confine young black men to their neighborhood, family, friends, associates, enemies and even the police.

Presenter: Ken Snoddy has been employed with the Madison Police Department for over 17 years. His current assignment is with the East Community Policing Team. He has worked in patrol, a state street neighborhood officer and as an educational resource officer. He was a member of the Dane County Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Oversight Board (2003-2004) and UW Platteville Racial Disparities Task Force. He is also been a member of MPD’s Implicit Bias Group and Diversity Inclusion Team.

Co-presenter & Game facilitator: Lester Moore has served in Law Enforcement for nearly 20 years. He is currently assigned as a neighborhood officer in one of the most challenged neighborhoods in Madison Wisconsin. He is a former member of the Crime Prevention Gang Unit and has worked many other assignments to include Uniformed Narcotics officer for the Dane County Narcotics and Gangs Task Force where he served as the unit’s gang specialist and Specially Deputized United States Marshal for the USMS Badgerland Fugitive Apprehension Team. Officer Moore has assisted with several federal and state prosecutions of gang members and has been asked to provide expert testimony in state and federal court cases involving identification of gang tattoos, lingo, graffiti and hand signs. He has also been featured as a presenter and key note speaker at various law enforcement and gang conferences throughout the United States. He has also served as a trainer for police Departments throughout Wisconsin.

Session 9: Make Madison 2040

Description: During this session, City planners will present and facilitate an interactive discussion on Make Madison 2040, an inclusive process to update the City’s Comprehensive Plan which will guide investment, growth, and physical development in Madison over the next 20 years. We will discuss how the Comprehensive Plan relates to racial equity. We will also invite feedback through this session on how the City can improve racial equity in the planning process and how to best follow up with people and groups who share input.

Presenters: Heather Stouder & Brian Grady

Session 10: The Internet and the Impact of Online Racism on Youth of Color 

SESSION 10 WILL NOT BE OFFERED ON FRIDAY AS LISTED IN THE BROCHURE. THIS BREAKOUT WILL ONLY TAKE PLACE AS PART OF THE THRUSDAY AM BREAKOUTS.  

Session 11: Working as an Agent of Change for your Community

Description: This session will use Ho-Chunk Gaming as a case study to explore how a community can utilize unique opportunities to work as agents of change to empower their people. We will consider the historical context of the Ho-Chunk people, how Casinos and Gaming are connected to Ho-Chunk cultural practice, and how profits are used to directly benefit and support the Ho-Chunk community.

Presenter: Colin Price

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Call to Action: Our Voices Can Make The Difference And Push Congress Into Action.

Statement Regarding the National Tragedy in Charlottesville, VA.

Statement Regarding the Youth Curfew at East and West Towne MallsYWCA Madison Opposition to Youth Curfews at East Towne and West Towne Mall

Letter Concerning Reimbursement of Chief Koval

Letter on Proposed Wisconsin State budget

Letter Opposing AB 128

Letter Opposing AB 165 SB 107

Letter Opposing AB 238, 240, and 242

Letter Opposing AB 57

Letter Opposing SB 52 54 55 56 58 59

Letter Supporting AB 241

Letter Supporting funding of the Legal Services Corporation

Letter Supporting SB 53 and SB 57

March Advocacy Action Update Article

YWomen Lead: Learning Together article

2017 Moxie Conference Speakers

Circle of Women Program Information

Racial Justice Summit 2017

Racial Justice Summit Breakout Sessions 2016

Racial Justice Summit Breakout Sessions 2017