YWCA Madison

Summit Breakout Descriptions

Click the links below to jump to breakout session descriptions and speaker bios. For a printer-friendly version, click here to download.


October 3 AM Breakout Sessions (10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.):

October 3 PM Breakout Sessions (1:45 to 3:15 p.m.):

October 4 Breakout Sessions (10:00 to 11:30 a.m.):

 October 4 Post Summit Institutes (Optional)(2:00 to 4:30 p.m.):

October 3 AM Breakout Sessions

AM1: Historical Trauma: The Intersection of Trauma & Race

Description: Historical trauma is the collective and cumulative emotional wounding across generations resulting from cataclysmic events. The events are targeted to specific communities based on some type of group designation. Because the historical trauma has ongoing effects for individuals and communities, restorative practices offer a powerful pathway to understanding, reflection and healing. This session will provide information on trauma, and historical trauma in particular.

Presenter: Rebecca Ramirez

AM2: Not in My Community: How White Supremacy, White Privilege, and Other Forms Of Oppression Undermine Best Intentions

Description: How do events in Ferguson, Staten Island, Norman, Baltimore, and McKinney drive our communities apart? How can they be used as teachable, community-building moments? The recent surge in highly visible racial incidents impacts us differentially along racial lines, creating a unique opportunity to deepen the dialogue and understanding. This interactive and challenging session explores how these headline stories relate to the impact power, privilege, and oppression has on everyday interactions. Participants will develop skills and insights for effective personal and institutional transformation.

Presenter: Eddie Moore, Jr.

AM3: Mindfulness for an Inclusive, Just and Sustainable World (Part One)

Description: Transformative impact and practices in racial justice work involve deep listening and authentically connecting with, caring for, and tuning into ourselves and others. The work necessitates this mindful attentiveness while in the midst of myriad complex and, at times, intense emotions, beliefs, and interactions. For those leading these efforts and seeking to influence and affect positive and sustained change, these qualities and skills are particularly essential. Mindfulness practices are one tool to support this transformational work, helping us stay compassionately engaged and present, while avoiding the mirroring of hate and vitriol of those we may oppose. In this workshop, participants will learn about and experience ways to create spaces and cultivate practices for transformation and healing through: 1) learning first-hand about the collaboration, co-creation, and love involved in the planning and implementation of the Summit on Mindfulness for an Inclusive, Just, and Sustainable World (Edgewood College, March 31, 2017); 2) experiencing and dialoguing about relevant mindfulness practices and related frameworks; and 3) working together in small groups or teams to explore and begin to design ways to integrate mindfulness into engagement in dialogue, collaboration, and co-creation in racial justice work.

Presenters: Lisa Baker, Carmen Alonso, Annette Miller, Nola Walker, and Stephan Hiroshi Gilchrist

AM4: Pursuing Financial Justice and Equity in Communities of Color

Description: Black and Hispanic households are far more likely to face financial gaps than other racial groups. 55% of black and 52% of Hispanic households report net wealth of less than $10,000, compared to only 24% of white households. In the U.S., systematic barriers exist preventing minority households from building better financial futures. Lisa Servon, in her new book, The Unbanking of America, describes her experience working as a teller at a check cashing store to understand why financially struggling families leverage alternative financial services in a dysfunctional mainstream banking and credit system. Lisa will share insight into financial system changes that must be made to bring equitable access to all consumers. In addition, Filene Research Institute, a think and do tank for credit unions and consumers, will share actionable insights from their Reaching Minority Households Incubator. Filene’s goal is to systematically break down access barriers by rapidly scaling market ready programs in credit unions that meet the unique needs of minority households across the U.S. and Canada.

Presenters: Lisa Servon and Adam Lee

AM5: Introduction to Dignity for R.A.C.E. (Part One)

Description: Dignity for R.A.C.E. (Radical Accountability for Creating Equity) is a curriculum for understanding how an organization or program addresses racial equity through respecting, protecting and fulfilling a sense of dignity for African-Americans and other people of color. The curriculum is radical because of the intentional focus at addressing the root components of human engagement: personal and collective dignity. The goal of this curriculum is to understand, interpret and analyze the ways in which a person’s dignity may be affirmed or denied through the work of an organization. Dignity for R.A.C.E. addresses internal and external experiences of an organization’s staff and clients. This framework centers dignity as a mutually reflected sense of worthiness between individuals, groups and their communities that deserves recognition and accountability; b) interrogates and challenges interlocking systems of oppression from global and local viewpoints, and c) holds both the individual and the collective responsible for creating and sustaining equitable communities at all levels of engagement.


Presenter: Monique Liston

AM6: Navigating Triggers in the Workplace

Description: This workshop provides an overview of workplace triggers. Participants will learn what triggers are, and gain some understanding about how to identify their own personal triggers. The session will specifically focus on helping participants to build skills to navigate triggers in the workplace.

Presenter:Naomi Takahashi

AM7: Power Dynamics: Race and Power in Schools

Description: In school settings, educators often face a contradictory role. On the one hand, we know that developing authentic relationships with students is a critical prerequisite to creating conditions for learning. On the other hand, we are expected to “maintain control” over our classrooms. This workshop explores a more nuanced way of thinking about the exercise of power in schools-- power with, not power over-- and how to build inclusive, culturally responsive community that honors the personal power of all its members.

Presenter: Orion Wells

AM8: Transformational Leadership: from Tolerance for Diversity to Deep Systems Change for Equity

Description: Becoming a truly inclusive and equitable organization is challenging, long-term project, and requires shifts in people, groups, and systems. In this session, you will learn about specific frameworks and tools for embedding authentic equity practices into the work of your organization. Presenters will share examples, stories and strategies to ensure equity and inclusion move from theory to reality, highlighting distinctions between transactional and transformational change.

Presenters: Jordan Bingham and Angela Russell

AM9: I Resemble That Remark: Raising "Othering" to a Conscious Level

Description: Talking about race is uncomfortable, addressing systemic racism is daunting and achieving racial and gender equity will not happen without committed, self-reflective professionals putting theory into action. At times, when surrounded by co-workers with similar stated goals, advocates and social justice workers tend to look past, or collude with behaviors and policies that actually contribute to the systemic oppression of “the other”. The maligning costs of "Othering" must be exposed so that alternative skills can be practiced to make the changes necessary to create environments where difference is valued and everyone truly belongs. This workshop is aimed at individuals serving in diverse environments with low-resourced individuals and marginalized groups. Professionals from nonprofit and human services sectors will be engaged in discussion and activities that will provide opportunities to see privilege in action and practice using tools for regular self-reflection in route to their most empowering selves. Participants will build capacity to hold themselves, their agencies, and others in the field accountable to the frameworks of racial and gender equity.

Presenter: Renita Robinson

AM10: Youth Leadership & Racial Justice in Schools

Description: Student leaders are pushing educational organizations committed to equity to live into the racial justice values they espouse--across Wisconsin and beyond. Four school districts in Dane County, WI are members of the Minority Student Achievement Network (MSAN), a national coalition of 27 multiracial, suburban and urban school districts dedicated to eliminating opportunity gaps that persist in our schools. This session will highlight student-led equity initiatives in two districts that have had a significant impact on how students and educators think about and work against racism. During this interactive session, student leaders will lead participants through discussions on: a) the importance of student leadership and the work of MSAN; b) the planning and implementation of MSAN equity initiatives in their districts; and c) strategies on how to support student leaders within their own schools or community organizations. Never has there been a more important time for schools and communities to nurture and leverage student leadership in the work to create and sustain a future focused on racial justice and educational equity!

Presenters: Student Leaders from Wisconsin Schools with Madeline Hafner, PhD

AM11: Youth and the U.S. Justice System

Description: The W. Haywood Burns Institute has compiled the little-known history of the justice system’s treatment of youth of color. Spanning the years 1500-2007, our popular education curriculum Youth and the U.S. Justice System is designed for participants to understand the historical developments surrounding the treatment of youth. Participation in this training is focused on participants personally interpreting these developments and gaining a nuanced understanding of where the system has been and is today. 

Presenter: Malachi Garza

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October 3 PM Breakout Sessions

PM1: Neuroscience of Restorative Justice: Building Empathy & Resilience Through Restorative Justice Practices

Description: Empathy has been used as a determinant for virtuous behavior, which is why there is a broad and ever-growing body of research surrounding this topic. What is empathy? What does it look like in practice? How can we develop it in ourselves and others? In this workshop, we will draw on current research in neuroscience to develop a deeper and more complex understanding of how to cultivate empathy and resilience through restorative justice practices.

Presenter: Eugenia Highland

PM2: The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys

Description: This workshop will introduce the forthcoming The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys, created to support White Women to engage in concentrated, focused inquiry around their relationships with Black male students and the impact on those relationships of race and racism. Using video footage from interviews with both White female teachers and Black men and boys, we will facilitate an experiential workshop designed to generate new avenues of reflection and action for White teachers.

Presenters: Eddie Moore, Jr. and Marguerite Penick-Parks

PM3: Mindfulness for an Inclusive, Just and Sustainable World (Part Two)

Description: Transformative impact and practices in racial justice work involve deep listening and authentically connecting with, caring for, and tuning into ourselves and others. The work necessitates this mindful attentiveness while in the midst of myriad complex and, at times, intense emotions, beliefs, and interactions. For those leading these efforts and seeking to influence and affect positive and sustained change, these qualities and skills are particularly essential. Mindfulness practices are one tool to support this transformational work, helping us stay compassionately engaged and present, while avoiding the mirroring of hate and vitriol of those we may oppose. In this workshop, participants will learn about and experience ways to create spaces and cultivate practices for transformation and healing through: 1) learning first-hand about the collaboration, co-creation, and love involved in the planning and implementation of the Summit on Mindfulness for an Inclusive, Just, and Sustainable World (Edgewood College, March 31, 2017); 2) experiencing and dialoguing about relevant mindfulness practices and related frameworks; and 3) working together in small groups or teams to explore and begin to design ways to integrate mindfulness into engagement in dialogue, collaboration, and co-creation in racial justice work.

Presenter: Lisa Baker

PM4: You Say You Honor Us, But Why Not Include Us? A Discussion with Three Native American Women on How to Be Effective Allies and Partners to Native Communities

Description: Native American women have served as valued leaders within their communities for many, many generations, and recently Native American women have led movements to demand justice and equity for Native American communities throughout the United States. In Madison, rarely do Native women serve as leaders nor do they hold positions of power. Furthermore, Native American people are often left out of important conversations and are not included in fights for equity, despite Wisconsin being home to 11 federally recognized tribes. Three Native American women who are working hard in their fields and elsewhere in the community to bring Native American issues to the forefront and ensure Native communities are part of policies, programs, and solutions to make the community and the state more equitable will share their experiences and offer guidance on how to be an effective ally and partner.

Presenters: Wenona Wolf (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe), Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Danielle Yancy (Menominee), UW Health & Kelly Jackson, (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) 

PM5: Walk a Mile in their Shoes: Screening and Talkback

Description: Watch an excerpt of the film "Walk a Mile in their Shoes,'' a documentary about the lives of five marginalized individuals. In the excerpt we will hear Ray Rosales's story about migrating to the US and the hardships he faces as an undocumented Mexican immigrant.  Participate in a talkback with the filmmakers as well as Ray and his family. Identify the issues and explore solutions by listening to the people facing the obstacles themselves. 

See the trailer: Here

Presenters: Johnny and Marie Justice

PM6: The Criminalization of Black Children

Description: This highly interactive workshop will invite you to consider scenarios in which black children are criminalized from different perspectives and to look within yourself to come up with ways to address these challenges together. Participants will be prompted to give honest responses to what they think the expected outcome of the scenario would be in real life, as well as what the outcome SHOULD be. Participants will then be challenged to explore what we can all do individually and as a community to change our mindsets to help us react differently in the future.

Presenter: AJ Carr

PM7: Sustaining Community & Government Racial Equity Initiatives

Description: Too often, government and institutional policies and programs are developed and implemented without thoughtful consideration of racial equity. When racial equity is not explicitly brought into operations and decision-making, racial inequities are likely to be perpetuated. This workshop features real community examples and a panel of practitioners utilizing racial equity tools. Participants can expect to become familiar with the Racial Equity Toolkit, and the necessary conditions and approach for using this Toolkit effectively to expand racial equity internally and in communities of color. Panelists will discuss what elements should be in place to set a racial equity initiative up for success, what barriers you can anticipate when planning for racial equity, and how you can work to sustain racial equity through challenging times

This workshop is presented by The Center for Social Inclusion and its Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE) - a national network of government working to achieve racial equity and advance opportunities for all.

Presenter: Gordon Goodwin

PM8: Introduction to Dignity for R.A.C.E. (Part Two)

Description: Dignity for R.A.C.E. (Radical Accountability for Creating Equity) is a curriculum for understanding how an organization or program addresses racial equity through respecting, protecting and fulfilling a sense of dignity for African-Americans and other people of color. The curriculum is radical because of the intentional focus at addressing the root components of human engagement: personal and collective dignity. The goal of this curriculum is to understand, interpret and analyze the ways in which a person’s dignity may be affirmed or denied through the work of an organization. Dignity for R.A.C.E. addresses internal and external experiences of an organization’s staff and clients. This framework centers dignity as a mutually reflected sense of worthiness between individuals, groups and their communities that deserves recognition and accountability; b) interrogates and challenges interlocking systems of oppression from global and local viewpoints, and c) holds both the individual and the collective responsible for creating and sustaining equitable communities at all levels of engagement. Dignity for R.A.C.E. is not a strategy or checklist. It is a process that addresses multiple levels of organizational and program impact simultaneously through a cohesive framework for critical thinking and engagement. It can be used in conjunction with other strategies and practices such as Social Emotional Learning, Trauma Informed Care, Life Course Approaches or It is a call to action to tangibly address the societal impacts of oppression from interpersonal to systemic levels.

Presenter: Monique Liston

PM9: Horizontal Hostility: A barrier to women's collective empowerment

Description: Have you ever heard it said "You're either a part of the problem, or a part of the solution"? Participants in this workshop will engage the concept of "Horizontal Hostility" and be exposed to the intersections of gender and race against the back drop of oppression in a society with historically male dominated leadership. This facilitated discussion amongst individuals who have experienced oppression will serve as an exercise of liberation revealing possible answers to questions about why certain colleagues and clients respond the way they do to certain stimuli. Former participants in similar sessions have expressed appreciation for this guide through the rough terrain of understanding modern survival of the fittest behaviors amongst similarly oppressed marginalized groups. Participants will leave this workshop recognizing they have a choice in supporting healthy “womanity.”

Presenter: Renita Robinson

PM10: Conscious Collaboration: How Your Cultural Beliefs and Values Impact Collaboration

Description: You’ve probably heard, “We want to include them, but they don’t … show up … have the “right” perspective … understand all the nuances. Here’s the thing. There are underlying dynamics of how race, gender, ethnicity age and ability differences play out in teams and communities. If they are poorly understood or not effectively addressed they impact team performance, creativity, and culture. In this session, participants will explore key concepts to develop the ability to create culturally collaborative work groups and communities. The session will also equip participants with several strategies and techniques for creating synergy in building and maintaining instrumental relationships for working across differences. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for inclusive collaboration with individuals, groups and key decision makers to effectively align initiatives to goal achievement.

Presenter: Deborah Biddle 

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October 4 Breakout Sessions

Session 1: Transracial Intercountry Adoption: The Token Child

Description: The navigation of bodies of color in white communities and families created via intercountry adoption. Listen to the voices of Ethiopian and Korean adoptees as they have navigated their white families and school life in predominately white spaces. An invitation to attendees to support a mentorship program for young adoptees by connecting them with adult adoptees who have lived their experiences.

Presenters: Rosita González and Kalkidan Solomon Fett

Session 2: Community & the Love Poetic

Description: Community as praxis. When we frame our work through the lens of violence, even tacit violence through our language, we limit our capacity to purge this same violence from the neighborhoods where we work, live, love and play. Centered in a framework developed around our collective capacity for love, this workshop will explore ways to reframe our thinking around neighborhoods, with a deliberate intent of utilizing love as the foundational bedrock through which community is developed, nurtured and sustained. Participants will be invited to engage in an ongoing experience of critical reflection on how we are experiencing our community, based on vulnerability and the creation of the necessary space for dissent. This workshop intends to move participants to consciously resist and dismantle the foundation of tenets through which White Supremacy can exist, and repatriate the practice of community.

Presenters: Ananda Mirilli and Justice Castaneda

Session 3: Hate at Home: A Community Response

Description: The Fair Housing Center of Greater Madison (a satellite office of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council) is very concerned about hate and harassment occurring right here in Madison based on religion, national origin, race, sexual orientation, disability, and other forms of xenophobia. In response, FHCGM will convene a panel of local experts to discuss recent trends in hate crimes, discrimination, harassment, and incidents of bias in the Madison area, with a focus on housing. Panelists will also discuss their thoughts on how to address and respond to these incidents moving forward. Panelists will include Masood Akhtar from We Are Many-United Against Hate; Tori Pettaway, Equity Coordinator for the City of Madison; Officer Alexandra Nieves-Reyes from the Madison Police Department; Fabiola Hamdan from Joining Forces for Families, Latino Support Network, and Latino Children and Families Council; Darla Lannert from OutReach; and Tracy Miller from Access to Independence. After the panel discussion, the panelists and facilitators will guide audience members through a discussion on how to build effective, cooperative responses to hate in our community.

Moderator: Alison Ahlgrim, Fair Housing Center of Greater Madison

Session 4: Retaining A Diverse Workforce: Tools for sustaining diversity and inclusion

Description: In "The Business Case for Racial Equity" (2013), the Kellogg Foundation states: “research has shown that businesses with a more diverse workforce have more customers, higher revenues and profits, greater market share, less absenteeism and turnover, and a higher level of commitment to their organization” (p. 5). However, retaining a diverse workforce is more than just hiring and recruiting diverse employees. Well-intended diversity initiatives often fall short of desired outcomes as they may increase awareness of diversity as an asset, but may not create significant, sustainable organizational change and thus may lack the inclusive structures needed to support a diverse workforce. As Verna Myers, diversity advocate states, “Diversity is being invited to the party; Inclusion is being asked to dance.” There are some practical steps required for changing the tide of diversity and inclusion initiatives within organizations and these must occur at both a personal AND an organizational level. In addition to exploring research about the benefits of retaining a diverse workforce, in this workshop we will explore the Multicultural Organization Developmental strategic change model to learn how businesses can facilitate inclusion by partnering with the YWCA on a journey of systemic, long-term culture change. We will introduce some practical steps the audience can take to encourage inclusion and equity in their work places. The work of the YWeb Career Academy will be used as a case study and model which can be adapted by other employment services organizations for which participants that have completed the program can later be successfully employed at partnering companies and other interested Madison organizations.

Presenters: Julia Block, Rasheid Atlas, and Naomi Takahashi

Session 5: Working Through White Fragility

Description: Through storytelling, videos, and small group work, this workshop will focus on the different stages white people go through as they develop awareness of their relationship to racism. We will define White fragility, how it can be a barrier to working for racial justice, and aid participants in developing strategies to overcome these barriers. Within a racist system that assumes white people's superiority, those of us who are white must challenge that assumption and replace it with a positive, anti-racist identity. We will provide opportunities and ideas to continue to move with courage and vulnerability to challenge institutional and cultural racism everyday, within our circles of influence.

Presenters: Tracy Stewart & Laura McNeill

Session 6: The Resistance: Advocating With for Latinx Undocumented Immigrants

Description: This workshop will focus on exploring the unique experiences of Latinx undocumented immigrants particularly as it pertains to oppressive and xenophobic implementation and proposal of anti-immigrant legislation. Presenter will share from her own experiences a Queer, undocumented, non-binary women of color and engage attendees in conversation so sharing of knowledge that ensues can serve as a stepping-stone towards fostering efficacious resources and treatment modalities for Latinx undocumented immigrants across health, advocacy and educational settings. Despite this workshop centering primarily around the Latinx undocumented experience, examples and discussions will be intersectional and an emphasis will be placed on how the undocumented Latinx experience relates to other immigrant and marginalized groups targeted by xenophobic legislation.

Presenter: Laura Minero

Session 7: Racial Justice Starts with us: Begin a Community Group for Witnessing Whiteness

Description: Shelly Tochluck developed a book workshop series, Witnessing Whiteness: The Need To Talk About Race and How to Do It. Come learn how to use this curriculum, to transform thinking and lives, by witnessing whiteness and interrupting racism. It’s likely that white folks want to do something about racism, disparities, and inequity. But what are you actually doing? This session offers a way to build your own capacity and your community’s capacity to forward anti-racism work. 

Witnessing Whiteness is an 11-week curriculum, available to anyone online, that follows the book. It’s designed to explore the white experience as it relates to racism.

Presenters: Laurel Finn and Laurie O’Donnell

Session 8: Innovative Approaches to Community-Led Organizational Change

Description: This workshop will highlight the process undertaken to develop a new program to advance equity. Acknowledging the negative impacts of a deficit framework, a new program called the Parks Ambassador Program was developed centered on community voices and wants, resulting in a unique and effective outcome. An iterative process, including focus groups, community dialogues, and key informant discussions was performed to catalyze systemic, structural and organizational change. The presenters will use the case study to engage participants in active discussion on the use of equity principles to develop impactful programs and services.

Presenters: Celina Martina and Raintry Salk 

Session 9: Survival Art: Creating Codes for Survival

Description: Gyasi Ross comes from a family of storytellers. He says “my family tells long stories, drinking coffee and blowing smoke in your face. It just fit for me to tell stories, and then I started writing them.” In this session, he will discuss how the art of storytelling is within everyone. He will explore how storytelling is an important tool to aid us in the current political climate in order to secure a just future. 

Presenters: Gyasi Ross (Blackfeet)

Session 10: Affinity in Struggle: Building Inter-Ethnic Solidarity in Social Justice Movements

Description: Drawing from the legacies of Afro-Asian, Queer API and QTPOC activists as catalysts for social change, this workshop will incorporate social justice pedagogy, feminist theory and grass-roots organizing tools to empower participants as change agents, and to build coalitions across ethnicity, race, faith and other intersecting identities. Discussion and skill-building activities will focus on finding affinity in our seemingly disparate struggles (racial justice, gender justice, immigration rights, and so forth) and the power of transformative leadership.

Presenter: Anjali Misra


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October 4 Post Summit Institutes (Optional)

Institute 1: The Body Already Knows: A Framework for Dismantling Race, Racism and Whiteness and Achieving Racial Justice

Description: What stops any of us from taking action, what hampers our courage, what slows our resistance to injustice? This workshop is based on two key ideas: The first is that the creation of Race (and the system of racial oppression it supports) serves to unnaturally divide us from each other and disrupt our inherent human connection. The second is that the 50 trillion cells in our bodies already know how to live in just and supportive community and these patterns can serve as a powerful framework for uprooting Whiteness and achieving racial justice. Thus, the dismantling of Race, Racism and Whiteness is not an idea or reality we “work toward” but rather a pathway that helps us all “come home” to our rightful human interdependence. And it is in the space of this interdependence, rooted in our bodies’ own knowledge, that we can find the deep sources of racial liberation and healing. While attention is given to embodiment in the session, the primary focus is the deepening our critical race knowledge base and the development of frameworks that can be used in any setting to dismantle Race, Racism and Whiteness. Participants can expect to leave with both cognitive and somatic tools for their racial justice work as well as resources to further their individual growth in these areas.

Presenters: Dr. Heather W. Hackman, Founder and President, Hackman Consulting Group

Audience: Target audience is white people with some experience/understanding of Racial Justice

Institute 2: Mindfulness Institute for a Just and Sustainable World

Description: CommunityThe Mindfulness Institute for a Just and Sustainable World offers a unique opportunity to engage in and experience practices that support the work of Being Belonging (Sonali Sangeeta Balajee, Plenary). Following the YWCA Racial Justice Summit, experienced mindfulness teachers and facilitators from the Summit on Mindfulness for an Inclusive, Just, and Sustainable World (Edgewood College, March 2017) are co-creating a space and offering practices that encourage grounding presence, as well as deepened reflection, awareness, and authentic connection. By the end of the Mindfulness Institute, participants will come away with both an embodied experience of relevant mindfulness practices, especially in the context of the Being Belonging frame, as well as will have some practices and concrete actions in which they can engage toward supporting individual and collective wellbeing and belonging.

Presenters: Lisa Baker, Carmen Alonso, Nola Walker, and Araceli Esparza

Audience: Open to All

Institute 3: Building Authentic Solidarity within Communities of Color: Leveraging our Affinities and Intersectional Identities as Diverse Folks of Color

Description: Join fellow summit participants in conversation and reflection around movement building towards authentic, intersectional solidarity. This institute is an opportunity for people of color to openly discuss racial justice issues within and between our own racial and ethnic communities. Reconnect, recharge and recommit to finding linkages in our anti-oppression work and overcoming the divisiveness that sometimes characterizes social justice endeavors. Co-facilitated by community members Geraldine Paredes Vasquez and Anjali Misra, this closed session provides space for summit participants of color to unpack the day’s events, find unity with one another, and begin to answer as well as pose critical questions in the pursuit of building authentic coalitions.

Presenters: Geraldine Paredes Vasquez and Anjali Misra

Audience: Open to People of Color

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  • Summit Sponsors

    Sustaining Sponsors
          

    City of Madison


     

    Empowering Sponsors

     


     

    Collaborator Sponsors

    Dane County Sheriff’s Office
    Department of Public Instruction
    Edgewood College
    Forward Community Investments
    J.H. Findorff and Sons
    Madison Area Diversity Roundtable
    Summit Credit Union
    Tamra Grigsby Office for Equity and Inclusion
    UW Credit Union
    UW-Madison School of Social Work
    University of Wisconsin - Madison Division of Student Life
    Wisconsin State Public Defender’s Office

    Nonprofit Partners

    ATTIC Correctional Services, Inc.
    Broadcast & Media Innovations
    Catholic Charities
    Center for Family Policy & Practice
    Community Partnerships
    Community Shares of Wisconsin
    Dane County Board of Supervisors
    Dane County Department of Human Services
    End Domestic Abuse WI
    Families and School Together
    First Congregational United Church of Christ
    First Unitarian Society of Madison
    Journey Mental Health
    Morgridge Center for Public Service
    Orchard Ridge UCC
    Sinsinawa Dominicans
    The Road Home Dane County
    UW Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
    United Way of Dane County
    White Privilege Conference/America & MOORE
    Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault 

    In-kind Sponsors

    American Printing Company